Baubo Bookshop: A Little Labour of Love

I am sure it is not a secret by now that I am passionate about mythology and ancient history. However, it has also been a long standing dream of mine to have a little bookshop that deals especially with these subjects where I can choose stories, books and artworks that I like to then repackage and reproduce them to a wider audience.

That dream has now come true and I am the curator of this little online bookshop called Baubo Bookshop. The story behind the name comes from a now forgotten legend which says that when the world was dying as Demeter, the goddess of the harvest, was desperately looking for her lost daughter, she met a woman named Baubo. Baubo told her a secret, made Demeter laugh and the world was saved as Demeter gained the strength to continue her search. What little we know about this story are remnants of ancient ritual of being together, sharing our hearts, laughing ourselves silly until we feel alive again to go and share this energy with the rest of the world.

That is the whole philosophy of this bookshop. We would like to give our readers the space to go back to the ancient legends whether it is to learn, to relate or simply to enjoy the stories that have given learning and entertainment to our ancestors for thousands of years.

One of my favorites, “Sirens” by ROOSDY

The artist responsible for the artworks you see on the Baubo Bookshop website is ROOSDY, a specialist of concept art, digital painting and commercial storyboarding. He takes inspiration from such classical painters as William Adolphe Bouguereau, Jean-Leon Verso, Edmund Leighton, Paul Delaroche and Frank Dicksee, and hopes to bring classical realism to modern commercial art and literary adaptations. His artwork is everywhere so do visit his pages sometime.

We add two affordable books on a monthly basis and we always add to our art page. For now, you can find our artworks and merchandise at Society6.

As an introduction to our new endeavour, “Forgotten Magic: A Collection of Mythological Essays” by Martini Fisher and R. K. Fisher is now available exclusively on Baubo Bookshop. This book is a compilation of blogs by me and notes by R.K. Fisher ranging from such serious topics such as the power of laughter and the philosophy of tickling. Also included in the book are writings from R.K. Fisher on topics such as the analysis of Santa Claus and the myth of chivalrous knights.

Those three women you see on the cover are the Moriae (the three Fates). They controlled the mother thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction. The three Moirae sing in unison with the music of  the Sirens. Lachesis sings about the things that were, Clotho sings about the things that are, and Atropos sings about the things that are to be.

The artwork for this cover is also available in our Society6 store.

Join in the fun and get the book this month. It’s on a discount for the whole of April.

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In Defense of Mythology: Some Things Cannot be Explained by Science

now-sing-about-the-race-of-women-sweet-voicedolympian-muses-daughters-of-aegis-bearing-zeussing-of-those-who-were-the-best-of-their-timewho-loosened-their-girdlesmingling-in-union-wi3.jpgWe often hear that something being dismissed as “just a myth”, which means that it is not true. In fact, myth and truth are often seen as opposites. If it is not analysed, written down in reports and be  seen or heard, then it is a myth. For many, mythology is the study of old, meaningless and untrue stories. Some people, repelled by the myths’ more preposterous elements and contradictions, see them as mere fabrications to be discarded in our “enlightened” age. But mythology’s enduring worth is never in its possible historical or scientific accuracy. Some things can be dealt with adequately only in poetry or mythology when recitals of data and observable facts miss the point completely. Love, hate, empathy, aversion, hunger, greed, altruism and all the other positive and negative aspects of being human are also facts. To ignore them by putting everything into numbers is to treat people as insensate objects and their lives as mechanical conditioned responses. This is the statistical perspective and it is as much a distortion of reality as any other limited point of view.

The word “family” is in itself a complicated word containing many combinations of facts, memories, meanings and feelings – it is impossible to describe the concept of “family” by series of facts alone. Every culture’s pantheon of mythical characters was the family in to which every person of that culture was born, as these creatures were as familiar as their parents and grandparents, siblings and cousins. Therefore, a myth is also not a simple proposition that can be judged as true or false  propositions. Rather, it attempts to make sense of our perceptions and feelings within our experience of the world in a narrative format. Myths have been there long before art, language or the written word.

IDMIcarusandDaedalus
Charles Paul Landon (1761-1826), “Icarus and Daedalus”

Of course, there are certainly many aspects of myths are not literally true. However, we understand the stories about the Greek gods because they share some of our emotions and ambitions – two things we cannot measure even if we tried. The stories of Icarus, for example, resonates with us because we have all experienced within ourselves  tendencies to try to fly too high or to force things that has no business happening to begin with, only to crash and burn. Although, as human experience is so multidimensional and varied, no myth can completely represent all of human experience, a myth still captures some important aspects of the domain of human experience it is meant to represent. It is like a map which captures only important features of the terrain but not every detail of the terrain it represents. And just like looking at maps, we learn through imagination, as we feel and visualize the colorful adventures of the deities or heroes. Although mythology is not a literal description of a culture’s history, we can still use myths to explore the culture itself – its viewpoints, activities, and beliefs, and address some of our fundamental and difficult questions that human beings ask: who and what am I, where did I come from, why am I here, how did it all begin?

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Bartholomeus Spranger (1546-1611), “Hermes and Athena”

Truthfully, we are still fascinated by the truths of these mythical stories and we still cry out for magic in our so-called rational world. As human beings are never meant to be totally rational, we crave a bit of mystery to counter our apparent understanding and mastery of the world.  To lend this comfort of mystery, humanity have had deities for many aspects of life. The Egyptians had more than 2000 deities while the Hindus have 333 million. The Irish honored both the goddess of rivers (Boann) and the goddess of the Lagan River (Logia). There have been deities for individual cities (Athena for Athens), mountains (Gauri-Sankar for Mount Everest), lakes, tribes, plant species, temples, constellations, and so on. Deities governed not only major phenomena such as agriculture or love or the sun, but also such common matters as leisure, the kitchen stove, guitars, politics, prostitution, singing, doors, virginity, willpower, firecrackers, gambling, drunkenness and the toilet. Deities have governed virtually every possible activity, object, and emotion, lending a bit of their magic into what would have been rather mundane and tedious interactions.

now-sing-about-the-race-of-women-sweet-voicedolympian-muses-daughters-of-aegis-bearing-zeussing-of-those-who-were-the-best-of-their-timewho-loosened-their-girdlesmingling-in-union-wi9.jpgAs myths are necessary, our modern society develops its own myths. A lack of myths can cause a sense of meaninglessness, estrangement, rootlessness, and the cold brittleness of a life devoid of reverence and awe. Now our “modern” myths seem to rest on certain concepts (such as “progress”) and in our larger-than-life celebrities. We revered Mother Teresa for her compassion and Albert Einstein for his intellect. Marilyn Monroe was a “screen goddess” possessed by the alluring qualities of Aphrodite while Muhammad Ali called on the aggressive instinct of Ares every time he stepped into the boxing ring. Through all these reverence we somewhat conveniently leave out the fact that Albert Einstein failed every exams he had in his school days, Marilyn Monroe was ultimately a tragic and lonely figure and Muhammad Ali was a gentle man off the ring – in short, they were all human, vulnerable and fragile. The media enlarges certain people to mythical proportions. We often project the “hero” archetype onto other people. Corporations myth lies in their “corporate culture.” There is a myth in every group and our mythology changes as our culture changes.

now-sing-about-the-race-of-women-sweet-voicedolympian-muses-daughters-of-aegis-bearing-zeussing-of-those-who-were-the-best-of-their-timewho-loosened-their-girdlesmingling-in-union-wi10.jpgWe each have our own mythology which we create. We have things and people which are important and valued to us personally. We are heroes in our “mythic journeys” by which we romanticize our various passages through life. The truly satisfying and exciting myths are those which arise from our own passions and our own visions. It just so happens that some of those myths have existed since the ancient times.